Caslon Miller Scala

A visual historical review of three typefaces.


CLIENT
Private

WORK
Typography

The visual and historical qualities of each type design have meanings all their own — they have connotations. 
To understand the connotative value of a font, you have understand its history — where and when it comes from, what it was originally intended for, and how it was first used. What you need to know, in other words, is something about the history of typography.

- Peter Cocking

WHAT IT IS

Three classical typefaces set in their corresponding historical contexts.

 

THE CHALLENGE

To represent the individual traits of each typeface by strictly typographical means.

 

MY ROLE

For William Caslon's serif "Caslon", created in the early 1700's I chose to emulate the style  of the original type specimen for the Caslon typeface. Simple typesettting mirroring the technical means of the time.

Matthew Carter's "Miller" is a modern revival of an Industrial-age Scotch Roman from the early 1800's. I decided to represent this age by a using a more mechanistic, mass-produced industrial feel to structuring the type on the page.

For Martin Majoor's old style, neohumanist, serif typeface "Scala" created in mid-1990's, I opted to set it in the rather tacky commercial style that was abundant in magazine and ads of the day.


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